TWISler Call Out: Our Governor needs to hear from us

Published April 8, 2011

TWISler Call Out: Our Governor needs to hear from us

Now, the TWISler said we wouldn’t be delving into state politics after the feedback we fielded from angry tea-baggers appalled at our scathing critique of Governor Skeletor’s questionable background. Fair enough, but it’s pretty hard to keep from questioning a guy that refuses to answer any questions. As you may recall, after Scott was forced to resign as CEO of Columbia/HCA for having filed the most fraudulent claims of any company in history, he went on to found a Florida chain of urgent care centers called Solantic Corp. In 2006, he predicted that Solantic would grow to 1,000 locations and become a publicly traded company.

He managed to open 32 of them, and was just starting to get on a roll when disaster struck: The voters of Florida decided to appoint him as Governor. Obviously, that meant he had to quit his day job. But it’s kind of tough to untie yourself from a $62 million investment, the heftiest single portion of your $218 million in personal wealth, especially when you known the returns on your investment are still in their infancy.

In most states, Scott would have had to sell his stock or put it in a blind trust where the assets would be controlled by an independent trustee and could be bought and sold on a whim. Luckily, this is Florida – the promise land of unethical, yet still perfectly legal, government practices – and ol’ Governor Skeletor has Titantic-sized political teabags made of solid titanium. He has to, because it would take some gargantuan cojones to move your shares to the Frances Annette Scott Revocable Trust when Frances Annette Scott is your own wife, which is exactly what Scott did just days before talking office in January.

So, according to Florida law, Scott no longer has any involvement with Solantic Corp. and any policy decisions he promotes as governor that may benefit the company he built up from 2001 to 2011 shows no conflict of interest on his part. His wife’s trust now holds the stock, not him. Problem solved. Crisis averted. Done and done. I’m sure the two high school sweethearts strictly refrain from discussing their family’s largest asset while in the privacy of the Governor’s mansion each night. And as you can see by her “Meet the First Lady” biography on Scott’s website (http://www.flgov.com/meet-the-first-lady/biography/), Ann Scott vehemently tries to steer clear of her husband’s involvement in politics…

Listen, we’re perfectly happy to let Florida allow Skeletor his legal exemption from political bias, but we’re not cool with the governor’s lack of insight into the issue. Scott basically won his position with a personally financed multi-million dollar 30-second commercial bombardment that would rival a Geico marketing campaign, while avoiding anything resembling an unbiased reporter as if questions caused cancer. That was fine and dandy in the election, probably even well-played. But that shit ain’t gonna fly now that he has the job. Or is it?

Since reciting the oath, Scott has seldom agreed to explain the logic behind his decisions to any media outlet outside of Fox News, and has even started hosting 30-minute Twitter and Facebook “town hall meetings.” Apparently, his supporters online know all the right questions to ask, and they’re also much less nosey than all those hoity toity “professional journalists.” But hey, what about the 18 million Floridians who don’t follow Scott’s tweets? We have questions too, such as:
1. Why didn’t you place your stocks in a blind trust, as most elected officials do, rather than a personal trust held by your wife, which allows her to trade and extract the assets at will?

2. As a private healthcare provider contracting with several private Medicaid plans, will Solantic Corp. profit from the bill you’re supporting to move nearly 3 million Medicaid recipients into private managed care plans?

3. As a company that provides drug-screening services, will Solantic Corp. profit if your calls for drug testing state employees and welfare recipients become law?

4. The governor appoints the heads of the Agency for Health Care Administration and Department of Health, which license, inspect and investigate complaints against health providers like Solantic Corp., now controlled by your wife’s trust. Do you believe this presents a conflict of interest?

5. Your recently proposed budget slashes funding to public health departments. As a private healthcare provider, will Solantic Corp. profit from these cuts?
All of us here in TWISville know we would sure like to hear Governor Scott’s thoughts on some of these matters. And we’re thinking that maybe he just hasn’t been asked enough yet. So, in order to make sure he’s fully aware of our inquisition, we are asking our faithful readers to take 15 seconds to drop our governor a little note. He’s made it super easy, too! All you have to do is fill out your name and email on the online form here: http://www.flgov.com/contact-gov-scott/email-the-governor/, copy and paste the above five questions in the message box, and send it on its merry way straight to the governor’s desk!

We’re pretty sure after such a nail-bitingly close election and all the fiscal restoration work Scott’s been doing, he probably just hasn’t had time to sit down and answer our questions. That’s OK, we understand buddy. We’ll just keep sending them to you as reminders. Feel free to take your time and respond at your leisure. We just want to make sure you don’t forget about us.

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